outdoor time

Thoughts Going Into Our Second Term and Booklist

chalkboard side
going into our second term

First, I share what thoughts I had as we finished up our first term in a Charlotte Mason education. Next, I write a list of living books we will use during the second termFinally, I include Charlotte Mason exam resources.

Thoughts About our First Term

When we finished our first term exam week, I sat down and reflected on both how my son narrated what he knew, and I also thought about how I would like to personally push myself farther in educating him well. Here are the notes I came up with:

Subjects and Takeaways

Daily Lessons

Bible: In the beginning, I was most reserved about our Bible lessons. My fear came from within, because growing up, I did not read the Bible much. However, as we moved into our third week, I relaxed and found a groove. We looked forward to this lesson more and more.

  • Takeaway: In the beginning, I was consistent in finding beautiful art pictures to go along with our Bible readings. However, I slipped in the last couple of weeks and didn’t present those beautiful images to him. So, I would like to bring that practice back.

Writing: We first focused on forming the letters – first the capital letters, and then the lower case letters. By the end of the term, my son was writing a few words and small phrases.

  • Takeaway: I would like to continue to find encouraging and beautiful words from his school books for him to practice writing, and also begin dictation.

Nature Study: We had a good start to nature study. By the end of the term, we certainly were in a regular rhythm of stepping outdoors and taking a walk in nature daily.

  • Takeaway: I would like us to develop a regular practice of nature journaling at least two times per week. Additionally, I plan to ask my son to specifically draw twigs, birds, and bugs he observes. Even thought we loved one of our nature study books, and didn’t quite get into another one, I felt like I may change to a different book for the change in season. Also, personally, I would like to read in the Handbook of Nature Study for ten minutes per day to help with the nature study lessons.

Math: I loved the math curriculum we choose. It is very open and go, which is nice to have as a busy mama.

  • Takeaway: I feel like I may need to move slower and require full attention a bit more with this subject. I’m also moving the math lesson to earlier in the morning, so his mind is more fresh, and he is likely to pay attention a bit more. When we resume lessons, I plan to review math symbols with him and the concept of subtraction, until I feel he has a solid understanding of it.

Reading: We began by simply learning the sounds for letters – first the capital letters, and then the lower case letters. By the end of the term, we had moved onto making words together, and reading them. While this seems challenging for my son, we are enjoying it and he is recognizing more words in print.

  • Takeaway: I plan to continue alternating learning sight words, and then word building, using words from previous lessons. I found this took a few minutes of planning the day before, but was fun for my son, for the most part, in his reading lessons.

Delightful Lessons

French: French was fun to learn! I have to admit I don’t have any experience learning French, so I was rather intimidated in the beginning. However, we really enjoyed looking at pictures together, learning vocabulary, singing French songs, and listening to Little Red Riding Hood in French.

  • Takeaway: Since we enjoyed the short story, I plan to continue using the same story until we finish it. Also, we will learn two new french poems and two new french songs this term, as well as new vocabulary.

Drawing: Drawing is a delight for my son and I to do together. However, that was no surprise to me!

  • Takeaway: As mentioned before, I would like my son to draw twigs, birds, and bugs specifically during the winter months. Also, in general, I would like to encourage him to use charcoal and his watercolors more frequently.

Recitation: My son enjoyed reciting a poem last term, as well as a Christmas hymn and part of a Bible verse.

  • Takeaway: We didn’t cover quite as much scripture recitation as I would like. So, I plan to make sure to focus a bit more on reciting Bible passages beautifully and carefully.

Literature: Anything that involves a good read aloud story is typically enjoyed by my family. My son really learned narration well with Aesop’s Fables and often asked for more and more of them.

  • Takeaway: I would also like to instill a daily reading of poetry in the afternoon for fun. It is a delightful respite in our day, and I simply need to focus on making it happen daily. We will also add in new free read aloud books for afternoon time.

History: History was easily one of my son’s favorite lessons this term. The D’Aulaire Biography books were a favorite of his!

  • Takeaway: While I did show him maps on occasion, I would like to be consistently show him a map/globe of what we will be reading through before the daily lesson. We will be also continuing with our History spine, Native American book, and add in a new Native American book to read.

Geography: Geography was another subject I was apprehensive about teaching in the beginning. I’m still a little nervous about it. However, my son seemed to really enjoy the books we read about other children living in far off lands, and we did look at the globe quite a bit in geography lessons.

  • Takeaway: I plan to continue with a bit more focus on the afternoon lessons in Geography. First, beginning with observing the position of the sun, observing the weather, measuring our footsteps, talking about directions and beginning to use a compass. We did some of this last term, but it wasn’t as consistent as I would like.

Some Subjects We Are Simply Changing Materials

Music Appreciation: We enjoyed listening to Peter Tchaikovsky immensely last term! We will simply continue with a new composer this term.

Picture Study: We are studying a new artist in the second term. I also thought we could perhaps visit our first museum.

Singing: Singing was such a delight in our days. We plan to continue in the same manner, just singing new songs for the new term.

The Riches

Music/piano: My husband is a musician and a Recording Engineer. Since he is an expert in music, I asked him to teach my son piano lessons once a week. My intention was also to work with him at home most afternoons.

  • Takeaway: Since my husband is extremely busy working, he didn’t give him lessons regularly. Therefore, I’m hoping we can keep our goal of piano lessons once a week, with me working with him in the afternoons at home.

Handicrafts: The handicrafts lesson was a joy for all of us. We really enjoyed having this break in the midst of harder lessons.

  • Takeaway: We will continue some from the first term (origami, finger knitting, chores such as making bed, brushing teeth, putting away laundry), and add in new ones like folding laundry, wood working, and knitting or weaving.
outdoor time
outdoor time

New Books for our Second Term

Quick Note: this is not even close to a comprehensive list of books we are using this term. This is simply the new books we are adding in this term. Also, booklists are so subjective! Finding the right books for your child is so enjoyable and can make lessons joyous as well.

Nature Study: Burgess Bird Book for Children and Among the Meadow People

Read Alouds: Peter Pan, Pinnochio and Peter Rabbit (we are re-reading Pinnochio and Peter Rabbit!)

History: Children of the Earth and Sky

Geography: Carmen of the Golden Coast and Little Folks of Many Lands

Favorite Resources

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Geography Lesson.

General Charlotte Mason Resources

favorite living books
favorite living books

Our Picks

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

One stop shop for all of our favorite resources:https://www.amazon.com/shop/nourishedchildren

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

favorite living books

Ten Favorite Living Books for First Grade

Ten Favorite Living Books for First Grade

favorite living books
favorite living books

 

First, we discuss the definition of living books. Then, we explore the significance of why we choose living books for educating our children. Next, read on for our favorite living books, so far, by subject. Finally, I list resources. Also, if you are interested in learning more about Charlotte Mason education in general, I list more information about her educational philosophy at the bottom.

Living books definition

In Parents and Children, Charlotte Mason says:

“They must grow up upon the best. There must never be a period in their lives when they are allowed to read or listen to twaddle or reading-made-easy. There is never a time when they are unequal to worthy thoughts, well put; inspiring tales, well told.” (Mason, Vol. 2)

Living books are becoming more of a known idea. According to Living Books Library, living books contain “literary power, ideas, virtuosity, inspiration, narrative, imagination, and span generations.”

  • This is a great podcast describing more about living books.
  • Ambleside online also describes living books in this article here.

Why choose living books?

Charlotte Mason states:

“Therefore, the selection of their first lesson-books is a matter of grave importance, because it rests with these to give children the idea that knowledge is supremely attractive and that reading is delightful.” (Mason, Vol. 1)

Our favorite living books are the kind that make my son request chapter after chapter, or section after section, after we have read our portion for school time. They are the type of books that allow him to retain the facts, details, and storyline, often many days, or even a week, after we have read it. I can ask him to tell what he heard me read, and although sometimes he doesn’t feel like giving me a narration, he often surprises me to the extent of what he remembers. A living book allows learning to take place; not just learning is happening though, a lifelong love of learning is also fostered.

NOW FOR THE RECOMMENDED BOOKS…

LIVING BOOKS

I have always had a love affair with books. Books introduced me to various lands and lives that I otherwise would have not encountered. Books offered me refuge and respite when I needed it as I was growing up. It was easy to get lost in a good story. I’m so thankful to share this love of great literature with my children too.

TEN FAVORITE LIVING BOOKS FOR FIRST GRADE

Geography

Children of Foreign Lands – This book is a collection of stories written about children living in foreign lands. There are eight different countries included, and the illustrations are amazing. Both of my children are captivated by the stories, therefore, this book comes highly recommended.

favorite living books
favorite living books

History

D’Aulaire Biography Book Set – We have read Leif the Lucky and Columbus so far. My oldest son really pays attention to these stories (even when I think he may not be listening). Beautiful Feet Books sells the biography pack, and they are a better price when they are on sale.

Natural history

James Herriot’s Treasury for Children – This may be my oldest son’s all time favorite collection of stories. If I had allowed it, I’m sure we would have read through the entire chapter book in one sitting. Each story is written about a different animal, and told from the perspective of the town veterinarian. The illustrations that go with the stories capture my son’s interest. Also, my youngest son is sure to cuddle us with us while we are reading this book.

Tommy Smith’s Animals – Another book in this series was used in Charlotte Mason’s day. After reading a bit about recommended ages, I decided to begin with Tommy Smith’s Animals. This book hit the nail on the head, and my son is captivated. The story is about a young boy who is not kind to animals. After having a meeting to discuss what should be done about Tommy Smith, the animals settle on encountering with him one by one. They teach them about themselves, and encourage Tommy to respect the animals.

favorite living books
favorite living books

Literature

Aesop’s Fables for Children – I have to really slow down reading these to my son, because he wants to read ALL of the fables! I have two versions of this book since we love it so much. We also love this one for the illustrations.

Read alouds

Heidi – First, we watched Heidi on netflix during one weekend where we had been very physically active. My son was super interested when I then told him we had the chapter book of Heidi. My husband’s mother had a collection of classic books, which my husband inherited. I’m so grateful to share these rich stories with my children in our free time.

Boxcar Children – My oldest son especially is fond of trains. From the time he was two, he was building wooden train sets and configuring them in different ways.  He loves taking train rides, and hearing train stories. So, naturally, reading the Boxcar Children was a good fit for my family. I have great memories of reading the Boxcar Children series when I was growing up, and its fun to re-read them with my boys.

Billy and Blaze – I first saw these books at a Christian bookstore in Homestead Heritage Farms. After browsing through a few books, I knew my horse-loving son would love these books. So, I purchased this series, and my youngest son just loves them too!

Charlotte’s Web – Growing up, I loved the book and movie Charlotte’s Web. My son has seen the movies on netflix, and we have read the chapter book many times through together. The first time we read it aloud, he was four. I clearly remember him almost in tears when after reading one chapter, when I wanted to end the reading until the next day. He loves it so much!

favorite living books
favorite living books

Poetry

When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six – We began afternoon poetry readings before we started our official first year of school. I can remember being shocked at how both of my boys asked for more poetry after reading a couple of poems from this book. The illustrations are delightful. We have also enjoyed Winnie the Pooh together, and this collection of poems by the same author, A. A. Milne, is a great book to add to your rich read aloud collection.

favorite living books
favorite living books

Drawing

Brush Drawing Course – While this is not a living book, I wanted to include it here because my son loves art. This has been a great practice in learning basic brush drawing, or watercolor, technique. We thoroughly enjoy this time together, because we are completing the lessons side by side and are learning together.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

LIVING BOOKS RESOURCES

favorite living books
favorite living books

OUR PICKS

I’m sharing these here because these are my son’s FAVORITES. He always asks for more when we pick these books up!

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON

First Week Review in First Grade with Charlotte Mason

Our First Week

WHAT WE HAVE BEEN UP TO …

After much careful planning and consideration, we started Form 1B (roughly First Grade) last Monday.

Finally, we did it! One of the hardest parts is over, because last week, we began our First Week in First Grade with Charlotte Mason.

 

FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON
FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON

First Grade with Charlotte Mason

“Nothing is trivial that concerns a child; his foolish-seeming words and ways are pregnant with meaning for the wise.” (Mason, Vol. 1

For many months, off and on, much effort was placed on learning to teach my son. So much went into this preparation because it is currently the most important thing to me. Also, it is his first formal year of education at home.

WHAT TO EXPECT

I have a lot to say about our First Week, so if you are simply interested in the resources, please scroll down to ‘Our First Week.’

  • First, I outline six basic ideals for early lessons.
  • Then, I include educational resources we used for our first week. I emphasize materials my son enjoyed. I also highlight books or supplies I felt would be a huge resource to us as we move through the year.
  • Then, I show a sample of a day of morning lessons.
  • Next, I share some of my takeaways from our first week.
  • Finally, I end with our favorite resources in summary.

INSPIRING QUOTES

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason.

In the beginning, Charlotte Mason states on the first page of Volume 1 of Home Education:

“Now, that work which is of most importance to society is the bringing-up and instruction of the children-in the school, certainly, but far more in the home, because it is more than anything else the home influences brought to bear upon the child that determine the character and career of the future man or woman.” (Mason, Vol. 1

This could be discouraging, since it ways heavily on the parents. However, Ms. Mason quickly encourages Mothers, saying:

“The mother is qualified…by the creator Himself…” (Mason, Vol. 1

There are many subjects I’m not well educated on myself, therefore, I’m also learning alongside my children.

first grade with charlotte mason
first grade with charlotte mason

SIX IMPORTANT POINTS FOR LESSONS

  1. “That the knowledge most valuable to the child is that which he gets with his own eyes and ears and fingers (under direction) in the open air.” (Mason, Vol. 1
  2. “That the claims of the schoolroom should not be allowed to encroach on the child’s right to long hours daily for exercise and investigation.” (Mason, Vol. 1
  3. “That the child should be taken daily, if possible, to scenes-moor or meadow, park, common, or shore-where he may find new things to examine, and so add to his store of real knowledge.” (Mason, Vol. 1
  4. “That play, vigorous healthful play, is, in its turn, fully as important as lessons, as regards both bodily health and brain-power.” (Mason, Vol. 1
  5. “That the child, through under supervision, should be left much to himself-both that he may go to work in his own way on the ideas he receives…” (Mason, Vol. 1
  6. “That the happiness of the child is the condition of his progress; that his lessons should be joyous…” (Mason, Vol. 1

 

 

first grade with charlotte mason
first grade with charlotte mason

PREPARING THE FEAST

“The parents’ chief care is, that that which they supply shall be wholesome and nourishing, whether in the way of picture-books, lessons, playmates, bread and milk, or mother’s love.” (Mason, Vol. 1

I’m seeking to nourish my children in the best way and I can. Charlotte Mason’s philosophy has provided me guidance because I feel more equipped with tools to begin my son’s formal education.

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast.

NOTE

We did not cover ALL of these everyday.  However, we DID cover these subjects this week, using these resources. Please keep in mind also, we only read a few pages in some of these books!

Our First Week

Overall, my son’s favorites are the above resources listed for: Geography, Math, Singing, Natural History, History, Literature, Poetry, Nature Study, and Read Alouds.

first week with charlotte mason
first week with charlotte mason

MORNING SCHEDULE

+ First, make beds, brush teeth and free play.

+ Then, enjoy breakfast and help Mama with dishes.

+ Finally, Morning Lessons, which should last about two and a half hours for a little one. In reality, we were taking about three hours. So, I know I need to tighten up our transitions a little better.

+ Lunch. Then, after lunch, we move into the afternoons.

 

FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON
FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON

 

AFTERNOON SCHEDULE

+ First, we have playtime; so I encourage them to spend a couple of hours outdoors.

+ Then, during late afternoon, we come back inside. I read aloud good literature stories and a couple of poems. Typically, I play music from their Music Appreciation on while I ask them to clean up their toys.

+ One day this week, I introduced piano to them. I plan to increase this steadily as we move on, since it is suggested to work on this daily.

+ As we find our rhythm, I plan to also add by-the-way Geography lessons as we spend daily time outdoors.

+ Also, one afternoon this week, we went to a creek to spend time outdoors in a special nature spot.

 

 

FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON
FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON

 

 

Charlotte Mason was a big advocate for outdoor time in the afternoon. She said,

“…the chief function of the child-his business in the world during the first six or seven years of his life-is to find out all he can, about whatever comes under his notice, by means of his five senses; that he has an insatiable appetite for knowledge got in this way; and that, therefore, the endeavor of his parents should be to put him in the way of making acquaintance freely with Nature and natural objects…” (Mason, Vol. 1).

I love this quote because it takes the pressure off us Mamas to “entertain” the little ones. It is perfectly
fine NOT to keep up with the pressures of society that implore the youngest of children must be shuffled
around from activity to activity, as if they are adults. I believe it is more important to protect this sweet, innocent time for our littles…and allow them the freedom to explore, move, and be in nature as much as possible.

 

FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON
FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON

FIRST WEEK LESSONS FOR MAMA

I learned so much in these first days teaching my littles in a formal education. Additionally, I have much more to learn.

  • First, say a quick prayer before lessons (either with kiddos or alone). On the day I didn’t make time for this, we had a chaotic morning.
  • Next, spend a few minutes preparing for your morning lessons. I usually spend less than ten minutes on this each morning, however, on the day I didn’t, I didn’t feel at peace.
  • Observe my son for signs of weariness. When my son was fidgety, wandering off, or not listening, it was time to have either a small break, or switch to the next lesson. This is hard for me because I want him to soak up ALL OF THIS GOODNESS.
  • Next, I need to lower my expectations. In my mind, my son, at six, should be the next Einstein. Woah! I had no idea that my perfectionist tendencies would come out (mostly as an internal dialogue). These are not helpful to anyone, so I’m working on finding the joy instead.
  • Finally, I took about five minutes or less each day, to write what we had specifically done in lessons. This was like a journal entry. Mostly, I wrote down what ideas he understood, and where we left off so we know where to pick back up again.

FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON
FIRST GRADE WITH CHARLOTTE MASON

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

FIRST WEEK RESOURCES

  • Morningtide to Eventide Homeschool Planner. I love this planner because it has suggested daily Bible readings for Mama, daily planner space, as well as daily lesson spaces for the boys.
  • Art Images to go along with our Bible readings.
  • Simply Charlotte Mason Podcast on Starting a Charlotte Mason Education from Scratch. This was encouraging to listen to on my final day of the first week because it solidified some thoughts I was having about our first week.

OUR PICKS

I’m sharing these here because these are my son’s FAVORITES. He always asks for more when we pick these books up!

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

charlotte mason handicrafts lesson

A Charlotte Mason Handicrafts Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Handicrafts Lesson

charlotte mason handicrafts lesson
charlotte mason handicrafts lesson

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason Handicrafts Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be awe inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“Every day, every hour, the parents are either passively or actively forming those habits in their children upon which, more than upon anything else, future character and conduct depend.” (Mason, vol. 6)

 

Boys in the kitchen strawberry jam
Boys in the kitchen strawberry jam

 

A Charlotte Mason Handicrafts Lesson

WHAT

When I first heard of Charlotte Mason, I took a “What Style Homeschool Teacher are You?” quiz. Since I received Charlotte Mason as my top choice, I believed my results were inaccurate because I couldn’t identify readily with some of the various subjects. Next, I took a different homeschool quiz in order to find the same results! Eventually, however, I knew in my heart that Charlotte Mason was the right way to go to teach my children. I was still nervous, however, about handicrafts because of my inexperience.

“The Handicrafts best fitted for children under nine seem to me to be chair-caning, carton-work, basket-work, smyrna rugs, Japanese curtains, carving in cork, samples of coarse canvas showing a variety of stitches, easy needlework, knitting (big needles and wool), etc.” (Mason, vol. 1)

The quote above sounds like a foreign language to me, because it shows many skills I do not have. Therefore, I’m preparing to use a few resources to get us started. Since I feel inexperienced with handicrafts, I’m also keeping things simple in our first year. First, I’m focusing on what I know. Next, I will include recommended resources to learn new skills.

WHAT WE ARE USING

First, we will begin with a few household chores. Then, we will add in beginning handicrafts such as: paper folding and origami.

 

MY BEGINNING SELECTIONS

  • House Chores
    • First, we will build these habits:
      • make bed
      • brush teeth
      • set the table
      • clear the table
      • help with food prep
      • fold and put away laundry
      • help feed dogs
  • Cooking and Baking
    • Also, we will make bread, muffins, cupcakes, cookies, and learn simple meal prep.
      • I used to own a Cupcake Shop, and I LOVE to make healthy meal for my family, therefore, I feel super comfortable to begin with this!
  • Care for a small, Container Garden
  • Origami and Paper Folding 
  • Christmas Advent Activities and Gift Making such as:

RESOURCES WE ARE USING

We are using Slow and Sacred Advent , Rooted Childhood, and Exploring Nature Curriculum with Children  for some ideas because these come highly recommended. I have used these resources in the past, so I know they make great choices. If you decide to purchase Rooted Childhood, make sure to use discount code “nourishedchildren10” because you receive 10% off your purchase.

 

beginning sewing button craft
beginning sewing button craft

WHY

Handicrafts bring delight and beauty to the person who makes them. It is also suggested to make homemade Christmas gifts during the first and second terms. Providing this act of service to neighbors or others in need, also brings joy to those that receive the gifts. Charlotte Mason was a big believer in teaching a child to serve others, since Jesus served others too.

First, learning handicrafts additionally builds skills useful to the child.  The goal is not to create a “construction paper” type project. These are often discarded as quickly as it was made because they are not useful or beautiful.  Instead, handicrafts aim to provide something that can be used or cherished by the child or a friend forever.

Finally, as many Charlotte Mason subjects do, handicrafts bring beauty, physical knowledge, and joy to the child.

Practically Hippie

Rooted Childhood

WHEN

Charlotte Mason describes the Handicrafts Lesson as occurring five times a week, for twenty minutes each lesson. Also, Handicraft Lessons additionally typically continued during the afternoons, following morning lessons.

Ms. Mason also states handicrafts should occur daily because they are such a valuable skill to the child. She says:

“…Handicrafts and Drills-which should form a regular part of a child’s daily life.” (Mason, vol. 1)

 

charlotte mason handicrafts lesson
charlotte mason handicrafts lesson

HOW

“The points to be born in mind in children’s handicrafts are: (a) that they should not be employed in the making futilities such as pea and stick work, paper mats, and the like; (b) that they should be taught slowly and carefully what they are to do; (c) that slipshod work should not be allowed; (d) and that, therefore, the children’s work should be kept well within their compass.” (Mason, vol. 1)

  • First, handicrafts provide a meaningful purpose and skill for the child.
  • Second, children are taught the craft in slow, manageable chunks. This cuts down on frustrations with the child, and enables him to slowly and carefully progress in the project.
  • Third, hasty and careless work should not be accepted.
  • Finally, the child’s work should be appropriate.

charlotte mason handicrafts lesson
charlotte mason handicrafts lesson

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Handicrafts Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON HANDICRAFTS LESSON RESOURCES

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

charlotte mason drill lesson

A Charlotte Mason Drill Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Drill Lesson

charlotte mason drill lesson
charlotte mason drill lesson

 

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason Drill Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be awe inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“Every day, every hour, the parents are either passively or actively forming those habits in their children upon which, more than upon anything else, future character and conduct depend.” (Mason, vol. 6)

 

A Charlotte Mason Drill Lesson

Observing Flowers
Observing Flowers

WHAT

First, Drill is similar to what we know as Physical Education. A child should have plenty of free time in the open air, outdoors. Drill should be accomplished during morning lessons, since it provides a meaningful break between subjects. Then, it should be revisited again during afternoons. Some Elementary Drill type activities could be: climbing, swimming, skipping rope, dancing, playing games, and singing.

First, Charlotte Mason points out:

“…the more they run, and shout, and toss their arms, the more healthful is the play. And this is one reason why mothers should carry their children off to lonely places, where they may use their lungs to their hearts content without risk of knowing anybody.” (Mason, vol. 1)

I’m comforted by Charlotte Mason’s philosophy of allowing the child to physically move out of doors because I have two very active young boys. It is so uplifting to hear her say to let the children be children. She encourages them to use their voices in nature in order to assist the natural energy of a child.

Next, she goes onto say:

“noisy play…is no more than Nature’s way of providing for the due exercise of organs, upon whose working power the health and happiness of the child’s future largely depend.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Drill has a flexible element to it, because it can be synonymous with play. Play is essential for the child. It also provides a valuable break in the mental school lessons of the morning. This assists a child to focus when they return to their morning lessons.

Sometimes, a child may sing, play games, or dance for Drill. Drill encompasses all of these things. Often, a child can simply invent their own games, using their imagination because this is valuable. Play is an excellent skill since it also allows the child to absorb their morning lessons.

WHAT WE ARE USING

First, I have printed off a few pages from each of these resources listed below for the beginning student.

MY BEGINNING SELECTIONS

  1. Examples of Singing Games: The Mulberry Bush, BINGO,  and The Muffin Man.
  2. Examples of Physical Education: marching and running, kneading dough, clapping, stamping.
  3. Examples of Games and Dancing: Alphabet March, Hickory Dickory Dock, Pat-A-Cake, and guessing games.

charlotte mason drill lesson
charlotte mason drill lesson

WHY

Charlotte Mason begins by saying:

“…some sort of judicious physical exercise, should make part of every day’s routine.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Organized sports are such a large part of our culture. The A Delectable Education ladies mention there is a place for organized sports, however, it should not take the place of daily Drill.

Also, it seems so often in our culture, that we stay indoors in a small room for much of the time. Drill gives everyone a chance to instead, move our bodies outdoors and breathe in the fresh air.

“Drill the children in pure vowel sounds, in the enunciation of final consonants….” (Mason, vol. 1)

Additionally, through singing games, children can work on pronunciation because it is essential.

“The object of athletics…is the preparation of a body, available from crown to toe, for whatever behest ‘the gods’ may lay upon us.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Swedish Drill was also used to train the mind and body connection. Swedish Drill hones the power of attention, concentration, and therefore, allows the child to become more self-aware. Remaining healthy is such an asset, and one we hold close to our hearts in our home.

WHEN

“…Drills-which should form a regular part of a child’s daily life.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Charlotte Mason describes the Drill Lesson as occurring five times a week, for ten minutes each lesson. Also, Drill lessons additionally typically occurred during afternoon lessons.

HOW

We plan to alternate the Drill lessons to provide a variety. Sometimes, I will encourage my children to have play. Other times, we may do singing and dancing games together. Then, the next day, we may try rhythmic games or physical exercise.

In the beginning of Home Education, Charlotte Mason says:

“…(climbing) is so admirable the body being thrown into endless graceful postures which bring every muscle into play,-and the training in pluck, daring, and resource so invaluable, that it is a pity trees and cliffs and walls should be forbidden even to little girls.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Charlotte Mason believed there is valuable growth happening when a child can move their bodies daily, such as climbing, running, skipping, or playing out of doors.

It seems there are many movement type activities that are essential to the youngest student (such as dancing or singing) because they are especially beneficial to the littlest ones.

“Dancing, and the various musical drills, lend themselves to grace of movement, and give more pleasure, if less scientific training, to the little people.” (Mason, vol. 1)

charlotte mason drill lesson
charlotte mason drill lesson

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Drill Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON DRILL LESSON RESOURCES

 

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

a charlotte mason music lesson

A Charlotte Mason Music Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Music Lesson

a charlotte mason music lesson
a charlotte mason music lesson

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason Music Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be awe inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“The mind feeds on ideas, and therefore children should have a generous curriculum.” (Mason, vol. 1)

A Charlotte Mason Music Lesson

WHAT

First, Charlotte Mason does not devote much writing to the music lesson, nor can I find many resources elsewhere. However, she does include it as a significant part of the educational feast, therefore, we are trying our hand at it. It seems to me that most mamas choose to provide outsourced music lessons for their child. My husband is an accomplished guitar player, and is self-taught on many instruments, so we are beginning with him (hooray)!

I’m using Mrs. Curwen’s Teacher’s Guide to educate myself because Ms. Charlotte Mason references it as a great resource. However, I will only be supplementing this as my children are ready, and when my husband is unable to teach the lesson. For the most part, my husband will be teaching them their music lessons, because music is his passion. Ms. Mason says:

“Mrs. Curwen’s Child Pianist method is worked out, with minute care…the child’s knowledge of the theory of music and his ear training keep pace with his power of execution, and seem to do away with the deadly dreariness of ‘practicing’.” (Mason, vol. 1)

WHAT WE ARE USING

 

ANOTHER RESOURCE TO CONSIDER

The Suzuki Method also seems recommended, because it appears in line with Charlotte Mason’s educational philosophy. It has wonderful reviews, and seems to be pretty readily available.

WHY

Mrs. Curwen says, in a Parent’s Review Article on Music Teaching:

“…the piano is the best medium for teaching a child the theory of music easily, and that no time spent in learning the theory on the piano is really wasted, even if another instrument is later taken up.”

Therefore, even if the child moves onto another instrument eventually, piano serves as a strong foundation to begin his music lessons.

Perhaps most important, the benefit of introducing children to music is vast. The benefits range from: more language development, higher test scores in English and Math, increased brain activity, and appreciation for art, among others, according to this PBS article.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH MUSIC

I learned to play piano in upper elementary school. I played for about two years. Then, I stopped piano lessons, because I grew weary of practicing. However, I was quite good at playing piano, according to my parents.

Then, in middle school, I played the flute. I was able to learn to play the flute and read music fairly easily. This was directly related to my exposure to piano lessons.

As a result of my early piano lessons, I was able to excel playing the flute. I mostly tied for ‘first chair’ in eight grade band. Additionally, the high school marching band wanted me to play flute with them so greatly, they entertained the idea of me double dressing in a band uniform over my dance uniform. Ultimately, I decided to forego music so I could focus on dancing. However, I was surprised about 15 years later, when I picked up my flute, I was able to play a few songs and still read music.

 

WHEN

Charlotte Mason describes the Music Lesson as occurring every day, during the afternoons. They are not part of the morning lessons. Also, each lesson lasts about twenty minutes.

 

HOW

Mrs. Annie Jesse Curwen recommends beginning to expose your child to music in babyhood.

  • First, sing lullabies to your children, or sing nursery rhymes. These are an excellent start.
  • You can then begin playing and singing simple children songs several times a week to expose children to hearing music by ear.
  • She also recommends to introduce the Sol-Fa singing method to children because it will help build their vocal, instrumental, and theoretical education.

“If possible, let the children learn from the first under artists, lovers of their work: it is a serious mistake to let the child lay the foundation of whatever he may do in the future under ill-qualified mechanical teachers, who kindle in him none of the enthusiasm which is the life of art.” (Mason, vol. 1)

I’m very blessed because my husband is a recording engineer. He fluently plays guitar, and has taught himself how to play bass guitar, piano, drums, among others. Thankfully, he has agreed to teach music lessons to our boys. Also, I’m delighted because he has already begun. He has taught my oldest son Mary Had a Little Lamb, and a little about music notes, which my oldest son (almost six) has been able to understand.

Mrs. Curwen also says: “For the longer I live the more convinced I am that in music teaching the key to the whole situation is ear- training, ear-training, ear-training.” 

a charlotte mason music lesson
a charlotte mason music lesson

 

Therefore, I plan to begin learning more about the piano lesson by reading: The Teacher’s Guide by Annie Jesse Curwen (Child Pianist). Also, I will continue to spend time teaching singing in order to build a foundation for instrumental music lessons.

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Music Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON MUSIC LESSON RESOURCES

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

a charlotte mason narration lesson

A Charlotte Mason Narration Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Narration Lesson

a charlotte mason narration lesson
a charlotte mason narration lesson

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason Narration Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be awe inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“The mind feeds on ideas, and therefore children should have a generous curriculum.” (Mason, vol. 1)

A Charlotte Mason Narration Lesson

WHAT

“They must read the given pages and tell what they have read, they must perform, that is, what we may call the act of knowing.” (Mason, vol. 6)

Firstly, narration is the act of knowing. It is the work of a child’s education. Simply put, narration is: read, tell, and consequently, know.

“He must generalize, classify, infer, judge, visualize, discriminate, labor in one way or another, with that capable mind of his, until the substance of his book is assimilated or rejected, according as he shall determine; for the discrimination rests with him and not with his teacher.” (Mason, vol. 3)

Charlotte Mason thought a child should do the work of his own education. We are training them to be critical thinkers and to stand on their own two feet.

“Narrating is an art, like poetry-making or painting, because it is there, in every child’s mind, waiting to be discovered…” (Mason, vol. 1)

Oral narration often comes naturally to a child, even at a very young age.

WHAT WE ARE USING

All of our school books! Living books with a narrative quality will be suited best for beginning narration. Charlotte Mason recommends beginning with the Bible, animal stories, or fairy tales, so this is where we will begin.

 

FABULOUS LIVING BOOKS

WHEN

“Until he is six, let Bobbie narrate only when and what he has a mind to.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Charlotte Mason describes the Narration Lesson as occurring after every lesson. Also, each lesson lasts about ten minutes.

You can begin requesting a narration from your child when they are six. Start with one narration per day and work up to eventually narrating after every lesson.

WHY

Carroll Smith from childlightusa.com says, “For knowing to be real, we must be able to give it back…This richer, deeper way of knowing in which the child processes, assimilates, and gives back what she has read has a vital transformative power to nourish, grow, and steady the student for life.”

Ms. Mason seems to demonstrate that a child can easily learn the art of narration.

“’Let him narrate,’ and the child narrates, fluently, copiously, in ordered sequence, with fit and graphic details, with a just choice of words…” (Mason, vol. 1)

Oral narration has practical value for the child. It serves as the basis for public speaking. Typically, someone who can communicate very well orally, can also write well. Some suggest writing skills are enhanced by the ability to proficiently speak.

“On the whole, it is more useful to be able to speak then to write, and the man or woman who is able to do the former can generally do the latter.” (Mason, vol. 3)

A charlotte mason narration lesson
A charlotte mason narration lesson

HOW

“When the child is six, not earlier, let him narrate the fairy tale which he has been read to him, episode by episode, upon one hearing of each, the Bible tale read to him in the words of the Bible; the well-written animal stories; or all about other lands…” (Mason, vol. 1)

The ladies from A Delectable Education point out narration may come naturally to a child, but may not come easily.

STEPS TO NARRATION

  • First, scaffold the lesson. Talk briefly about the last lesson, in order to recall to mind the story.
  • Then, mention a few words that a child should pay attention to.
  • Possibly write names or terms on the board that are new or challenging to remember.
  • Next, read the short passage. Read it only one time. This hones the habit of attention.
  • After reading the passage, ask the child to tell back what he has heard.
  • Mama is to listen attentively.
  • Don’t interrupt or correct. This would be disrespectful and the child may lose their train of thought, just as you would if someone interrupted you.
  • Finally, Liz Cotrrill from ADE suggests to say, “thank you” to the child for the narration.

“Before the reading for the day begins, the teacher should talk a little (and get the children to talk) about the last lesson, with a few words about what is to be read, in order that the children may be animated by expectation; but she should beware of explanation and especially, of forestalling the narrative. Then, she may read two or three pages, enough to include an episode; after that, let her call upon the children to narrate,-in turns, if there be several of them. They not only narrate with spirit and accuracy, but succeed in catching the style of their author. It is not wise to tease them with corrections…” (Mason, vol. 1)

NOTES ABOUT NARRATION

  • First, read one time to a child.
  • Then, ask them to tell what they heard. If they can follow in sequential order, that is wonderful.
  • Start when the child is six because this is when Charlotte Mason proposed a formal lesson should begin.
  • Start with Bible stories, fairy tales, and animal stories, since these stories generally have a narrative quality.
  • Lessons are short; they are no more than 15 minutes and are probably much shorter as you begin.
  • When beginning narration for the first time, ask your child for one narration per day or per week. Gradually build up from there.
  • Eventually, you want every lesson, every subject, everyday to be narrated by the child.
  • Finally, a child in the upper elementary years will begin adding written narrations. However, the oral narrations are expected to continue daily.

 

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Narration Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON NARRATION LESSON RESOURCES

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be SO inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“The mind feeds on ideas, and therefore children should have a generous curriculum.” (Mason, vol. 1)

 

A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson 

WHAT

Here is one of my favorite Charlotte Mason quotes about Art:

“This is what we wish to do for children in teaching them to draw-to cause the eye to rest, not unconsciously, but consciously, on some object of beauty which will leave in their minds an image of delight for all their lives to come.” (Mason, vol. 1)

First and foremost, drawing provides a child with valuable skills, such as: observation, memory, and fine motor skills. Perhaps more importantly, however, learning how to draw gives a sense of beauty and expression. This allure can last throughout a child’s whole life.

Occasionally, in order to inspire this artistry, Mama can point out beauty in nature to the child, By observing things like sunlight, shadows, colors, and forms of all things lovely of earth and sky, the child can use these as inspiration for appreciation of art.

“Children have art in them.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Since my oldest son already enjoys painting, I decided to get him a few basic art supplies. My aim is to foster his natural love and ability of art. I’m hoping to watch it blossom, as we learn more about brush drawing as an educational subject.

WHAT WE ARE USING

“Children are worth of the best, and some half-dozen tubes of really good colors will last a long time, and will satisfy the eye of the little artists.” (Mason, vol. 1)

While you do not have to purchase the most expensive supplies, choosing good quality supplies that will last over the years, and across many children, is sensible.

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES:

The resources listed below come recommended, so they are the drawing supplies we will use:

  • WATERCOLOR COURSE.

Brushdrawing: A Basic Course by Emily Kiser and Richele Baburina. Here is the description about this course: This watercolor course in brush drawing features carefully prepared lessons that take students step-by-step from the most basic brush exercises to beginning painting from nature.

  • DRAWING BOOK.

What to Draw and How to Draw It by E.G. Lutz

Or, HERE it is FREE on archive.org

  • WATERCOLOR TUBES.

Daniel Smith 6 Tubes of Essentials Introductory Watercolors or 30 Economical Professional Watercolor Tubes

  • NOTEBOOK.

Canson Mixed Media Notepad

  • WATERCOLOR ROUND BRUSHES.

Watercolor Wooden Brush Set

WHEN

Charlotte Mason describes the Drawing Lesson as occurring two times a week. Also, each lesson lasts about twenty minutes. Additionally, it is recommended to have one afternoon drawing lesson per week, lasting about twenty minutes.

WHY

A Parent’s Review article written by Miss K. Loveday says: “And yet Art, when rightly directed, is educational…for it trains the hand and the eye, and it trains the head and the heart; it teaches us to see and to see truly…it disciplines the emotions.”

Drawing is useful because it trains exactness and decision. So many useful skills are learned by honing art skills, yet it is also such a rich subject to study. Therefore, we are looking forward to this subject immensley.

A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson

HOW

Ms. Mason says that a child may not produce a beautiful work of art at the beginning, however, the study of drawing is beautiful in itself.

“Children of six or seven draw budding twigs of oak and ash, beech and lark, with such tender fidelity to color, tone, and gesture, that the crude little drawings are in themselves things of beauty.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Children have a natural desire towards observing beauty in nature, therefore, it seems fitting to focus in the beginning, on drawing objects observed in nature.

Charlotte Mason also observed that children should start out with easy materials in drawing, such as chalk and watercolors. She believed by avoiding pencil and pen, it would allow the child to more easily produce well-observed drawings, which could allow their interest in art to continue. She says:

“…also, he should work in the easiest medium, that is, with paint brush or with charcoal, and not with a black-led pencil.” (Mason, vol. 1)

One more note about brush drawing indicates the brush should be held with the tip facing the child. This ensures that the child can view the brush more carefully, as he is adding color to the paper. Also, the child can move his arm from the wrist more freely, in order to have better control over his drawing.

“We must show the children how to hold their brushes and how to use them; they must see the whole, not only the tip.” (A Parent’s Review Article)

 

Drawing GoalS Per Term (about 12 weeks)

  1. Six brush drawings from nature

    • (Six wild fruits in fall, Six twigs in winter, and finally six wildflowers in spring)
  2. Six drawings from memory of animals they have observed

    • (Examples: dog, cat, birds, insects, squirrel, rabbit etc.)
  3. Original brush or chalk drawings of characters from their tales readings

  4. Drawings in nature notebook entries

 

NOTES ABOUT DRAWING

  •  A typical lesson could be: First, spend a few minutes on a drawing lesson. Perhaps, show your child how to hold the brush, and make a few simple strokes. Next, attempt to draw a natural object they can see before them. (A Parent’s Review Article(Examples: simple leaves, birds)
  • Another idea is to take a walk in nature. Then, bring home objects from nature, copy them in brushwork in a Nature Journal, record the date, weather, and location.
  • One article also points out to lay objects on a white piece of paper, in order that the child can more easily see true depth of colors and shadows, and the main shapes.
  • It is also suggested to keep the object you want to draw, at a distance to avoid over focusing on details.
  • Also, I plan to update this post with more ideas once we receive the Brushdrawing: Basic Course.

MORE NOTES ABOUT A DRAWING LESSON

A Parent’s Review article written by Juliet Williams, mentions a process for drawing:

  • OBSERVE. First, ask the child to see the object in nature. Ask your child to look carefully at the shape and colors of the object. Then, ask them to notice the shadow, and where they come from.
  • DIGEST. Second, is a lesson in memory and reflection.
  • EXPRESS. Finally, a child can express himself using the brush drawing to depict a careful observation of the object. One article mentions above all, we should encourage imagination and originality of expression.

Also, the act of observing is mentioned many times because of its importance.

“We must be sure that the children paint what they really see and not what they imagine they see; a great deal depends on making them look properly and carefully before beginning to paint, especially when it comes to considering light and shades in colors.”

Finally, Mr. Ruskin, whom Charlotte Mason references frequently in her Home Education volumes, says:

“It is only by the habit of representing faithfully all things, that we can truly learn what is beautiful and what is not.”

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Drawing Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON DRAWING LESSON RESOURCES

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be SO inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“The mind feeds on ideas, and therefore children should have a generous curriculum.” (Mason, vol. 1)

 

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson 

WHAT

Poetry can be intimidating, because its almost like a foreign language. We don’t often hear poetry included in our daily culture. Also, more than likely, we did not grow up hearing or being exposed to it. Charlotte Mason says that children: “must grow up upon the best.” (Mason, vol. 2)

She goes onto say:

“There must never be a period in their lives when they are allowed to read or listen to twaddle or reading-made-easy. There is never a time when they are unequal of worthy thoughts, well put; inspiring tales, well told. Let Blake’s ‘songs of innocence’ represent their standard in poetry; De Foe and Stevenson, in prose; and we shall train a race of readers who will demand literature – that is, the fit and beautiful expressions of inspiring ideas and pictures of life.” (Mason, vol. 2)

Poems are wide and varied, just as stories are. Some poems are written about seasons, nature, help answer questions, or are merely enjoyed because they are delightful. Therefore, there is poetry for everyone.

Miss Mason urges:

“…it is the part of parents to bring the minds of their children under the influence of the highest, purest poetic thought we have.” (Mason, vol. 5)

A variety of poems from a good anthology like A Child’s Book of Poems may be a great way to begin if you are unsure of which books to pick. Since I’m unfamiliar with poetry, I’m choosing many books that are highly recommend to begin with. Eventually, it would be great to highlight maybe a poet per term.

WHAT WE ARE USING

A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson is recommended many times as a introduction into Poetry. Also, since Tasha Tudor is the illustrator, I’m delighted to share this book with my children. Two other must-have books by Tasha Tudor are: A Time to Keep (a beautiful introduction to holidays and the calendar) and 1 is One (a gentle introduction to numbers great for preschoolers). Once you see her illustrations, you notice how beautiful and special they are.

A Child’s Book of Poems by Gyo Fujikawa is another well recommended first book of poems. The illustrations are also lovely, and I believe this will add to the appeal to my young boys.

Finally, the two books by A.A. Milne were also recommended: Now We are Six and When We were Very Young. Since poetry can be shared at anytime (not just during formal education), I have begun reading a couple of poems per day to my children. To my amazement, my boys beg for more! This shows just how appropriate these poetry selections seem to be for the young child.

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

 

Below, I share samples of some poetry I feel would be appropriate for beginners. Included are poems by Robert Louis Stevenson and William Blake, who are mentioned by Charlotte Mason as good poetry standards.

EXAMPLES OF GENTLE POEMS TO INTRODUCE TO YOUR CHILDREN:

MISS MUFFET
by Mother Goose

Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet,
Eating of curds and whey;
There came a big spider,
And sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.
FOREIGN LANDS
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Up into the cherry tree
Who should climb but little me?
I held the trunk with both my hands
And looked abroad on foreign lands.

I saw the next door garden lie,
Adorned with flowers, before my eye,
And many pleasant places more
That I had never seen before.

I saw the dimpling river pass
And be the sky's blue looking glass;
The dusty roads go up and down
With people that tramping into town.

If I could find a higher tree
Farther and farther I should see,
To where the grown-up rivers slips
Into the sea among the ships,

To where the roads on either hand
Lead onward into fairy land,
Where all the children dine at five,
And all the playthings come alive. 
LAUGHING SONG
by William Blake

When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy,
And the dimpling stream runs laughing by;
When the air does laugh with our merry wit,
And the green hill laughs with the noise of it;

When the meadows laugh with lively green,
And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene;
When Mary and Susan and Emily
With their sweet round mouths sing ‘Ha ha he!’

When the painted birds laugh in the shade,
Where our table with cherries and nuts is spread:
Come live, and be merry, and join with me,
To sing the sweet chorus of ‘Ha ha he!’

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

 

WHEN

Charlotte Mason describes the Poetry Lesson as occurring daily. Also, each lesson lasts about five to ten minutes.

WHY

“Poetry, too, supplies with tools for the modeling of our lives, and the use of these we must get at for ourselves.” (Mason, vol. 4)

Also, Susan Schaeffer Macaulay, author of For the Children’s Sake, says: “All children should have an excellent diet of mind-food to be nurtured on, so that their true education can begin.” She includes poetry as one of the essentials to nourish a child’s mind.

Perhaps my most favorite quote about why to include poetry in the educational feast:

“All our aspirations for the young are likely to be defeated unless we hand on to them a certain moral stability, a belief in beauty, truth, and goodness for their own sake; whereas if we give them these – … poetry will surely be included – we have at least the assurance that we have done our best to equip them adequately for the certain difficulties of this uncertain world.” (Parent’s Review Article)

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

HOW

Poems should be enjoyed regularly from a very young age.

  • First, read a few poems aloud to your children.
  • No narration required, just enjoy the feast!

Notes about poetry

As the children grow, poems are often added to a Nature Journal to support their Nature findings.

Poems can eventually be written down as copywork (writing).

A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson
A Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason Poetry Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON POETRY LESSON RESOURCES

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson
A Charlotte Mason French Lesson

Before we begin A Charlotte Mason French Lesson …

First, I explain why I’m focusing subject by subject. Also, I include Charlotte Mason quotes because I find her original lectures on education to be SO inspiring and helpful.

Next, please keep reading to see the break down of implementing lessons, the schedule, and resources I’m using that fit our family. Finally, I share the wealth of quality Charlotte Mason resources I have found helpful, from those mothers who have gone before me.

PREPARING THE FEAST

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests.” (Mason, vol. 3)

There are MANY subjects included in a Charlotte Mason education because she believed in spreading a wide feast. Sometimes, it feels a bit daunting for a new homeschooling mama.

Therefore, I’m attempting to learn, digest, and absorb how I’m going to be teaching each subject. I have decided to compose a blog post on each subject for Form 1B (roughly first grade). This will help me prepare to teach my oldest son in the Fall.

“The mind feeds on ideas, and therefore children should have a generous curriculum.” (Mason, vol. 1)

 

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson 

WHAT

“The initial ideas, that we must acquire a new language as a child acquires his mother tongue, is absolutely right….” (Mason, vol. 1)

In the beginning of a CM edcuation, children typically learned French as a second language. Furthermore, they continued French lessons for the remainder of their education. Additionally, three more foreign languages were added over the course of their 12 years of education. Therefore, by the end of their formal education, the children will have been introduced to four different languages in total.

After our first year, I plan to introduce Spanish as a foreign language. Since we are in Texas, this seems particularly practical for us to learn next.

WHAT WE ARE USING

While you do not have to use all of these resources, this is a great list to get started with. Also, be sure to note the ones marked (FREE).

FRENCH BOOKS

These books replace a French Text book, because they cover the basis for the young French lesson, using Charlotte Mason’s educational philosophies.

VOCABULARY LESSON

POEMS/RHYMES

SONGS

SHORT STORIES

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson
A Charlotte Mason French Lesson

WHEN

Charlotte Mason describes the French Lesson as occurring three times a week. Also, each lesson lasts about 10 minutes.

Ms. Mason writes you could begin teaching French words, and in general speaking French to your children, from a very young age; perhaps before formal lessons. In general, it seems easier for a younger child to pick up a foreign language, so introducing it early has its advantages.

WHY

“To train the ear to distinguish and the lips to produce the French vocables is a valuable part of the education of the senses, and one which can hardly be undertaken to soon.” (Mason, vol. 1)

A Delectable Education (ADE) mentions the English language is most influenced by French. This is because when William the Conqueror was King of England, French influenced language and culture for approximately 300 years.

According to the Linguist.com, 60% of English words come from the French language, or from Latin, which originated from French. Emily Kiser from ADE, mentions learning French allows greater ease for learning subsequent languages. Finally, according to some, French is an easy language to learn.

However, I find it to be intimidating to teach a new language, that I don’t know anything about! So, I’m seeking out resources to help me teach French to my children.

HOW

“The child should never see French words in print until he has learned to say them with as much ease and readiness as if they were English.” (Mason, vol. 1)

A child should hear the language spoken first, before seeing the words in print. So, just as a baby learns to speak his first language, by listening to words spoken, the same holds true for learning a second language.

“Again, the child’s vocabulary should increase steadily, say, at the rate of half a dozen words a day.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Learning new vocabulary is a wonderful means of learning a new language.

“A notebook in which she (Mama) enters the child’s new words and sentences will enable the teacher to (ensure new words are put into sentences, and are kept in use daily).” (Mason, vol. 1)

Therefore, I plan to record new words the boys learn in a notebook, so that we can revisit the words often.

“The organ of language – ask the child – is not the eye; it is the ear.” (Mason, vol. 1)

Language acquisition is first acquired through the ear. Children learn a new language by first hearing it spoken in conversation. This step is necessary to occur before the child sees the written words with their eyes. This method is more natural, and effective for the child to learn the new language.

A CHARLOTTE MASON FRENCH LESSON

VOCABULARY LESSON

Attempt to learn two to six new vocabulary words at each lesson, in order to gain understanding of French.

  • First, prepare audio files with a few new French words. Also, find pictures to go along with the vocabulary words.
  • Then, show the child one picture. Listen to the audio of the word three times. Next, ask the child to repeat the word after hearing it.
  • If applicable, gesture to show meaning of a verb or noun.
  • Finally, put the new word into a sentence. Speak the sentence three times. Ask the child to speak back the phrase. Also, if they don’t get it perfectly, its okay!

POEMS/RHYMES

A goal of memorizing two French poems per term can be attempted in order to teach the child French. One term lasts about three months.

  • First, prepare a picture and an audio file of a French poem.
  • Then, listen to the poem, one phrase at a time, and have the child simultaneously look at the picture.
  • Point to the picture as you hear the vocabulary words in the poem.
  • Then, listen to the poem two more times.
  • Finally, ask the child to repeat the poem along with the audio.

SONGS

Hearing, and memorizing one French song per term is also a great means of learning French as a second language.

  • First, prepare one picture and one audio of a French song.
  • Then, listen to the song, one phrase at a time, and gesture to the picture when applicable to point out new vocabulary.
  • If time allows, listen to the song three times.
  • Also, invite the child to sing along and gesture as well.

SHORT STORIES

Listening to one short story per term is another wonderful tool to learn French.

  • First, begin with one sentence at at time. Move forward reading longer passages as the child becomes more familiar with the language.
  • When possible, use pictures or gestures to introduce new words, while simultaneously saying it orally.
  • Next, ask the child to repeat the new word.
  • Continue reading the story, stopping after each sentence at first.
  • Then, ask the child to narrate back the story. Its okay if they can’t recite much back to you at first.
  • Read through the passage one final time.

NOTES FOR MAMA

One podcast I listened to, mentions if you can stay ahead of the child by one term, than you will be well prepared to teach the French lesson.

Also, Ms. Mason asked her teachers to read Hachettes Illustrated French Primer by Henri Bue in preparation to teach French. Or, you can find it online for free instead.

A Charlotte Mason French Lesson
A Charlotte Mason French Lesson

FAVORITE RESOURCES

Finally, I have come across some outstanding resources in learning about a Charlotte Mason education. I’m so happy to share them with you! Some of these are sources I return to daily because I’m preparing to teach my children. Additionally, I list specific resources for a Charlotte Mason French Lesson.

GENERAL CHARLOTTE MASON RESOURCES

CHARLOTTE MASON FRENCH LESSON RESOURCES

OUR PICKS

Also, check out these previous blog posts in the series:

Thank you so much for checking in! Finally, please stay tuned for the next ‘A Charlotte Mason Subject Lesson’ post.

Homeschool Preschool Supplies List

All of the quotes mentioned in this blog post, come from Home Education by Charlotte Mason. The Living Press published my favorite version of her books. Finally, I TRULY recommend any parent read Charlotte Mason’s books! They are truly treasured words I believe I will be reading and re-reading for many years to come.